Wedding Coordination for Bucks County, Philadelphia, Lehigh Valley, & Pocono areas|danielle@dpnak.com

Pick Your Wedding Colors with Coolors.co

Create your own wedding color palette with Coolors.co

While I might not be color blind, I am absolutely DREADFUL at putting together colors. Most of my wardrobe is black and neutrals mainly because of this problem. I currently moan and groan about the color I chose to recently paint our living and dining rooms because of this problem. And for the love of all things good, don’t ask me to pick out curtain colors, because I just can’t.

At least, not without some help.

When it comes to picking out your wedding colors, you might have this checked off your list a long time ago. Or… you might be like me. Overthinking every shade and wondering if you’ll absolutely HATE the color red by the time your actual wedding rolls around.

Well… you’ve been saved.

A few weeks ago, I was in the middle of an online course where they recommended a fun tool, Coolors.co. It’s an easy-to-use (and crazy addicting) tool that generates color combinations.

Seriously.

Go to the website, click on “Generate” and just start pressing the space bar on your keyboard.

If you find a FEW colors you like, you can lock them and change out the others. You can also play with the hue, saturation, temperature, and brightness to find that perfect shade. Once you find something you like, you can login to save it or simply copy down the HEX color code for any of your online projects.

One thing to note: there is ALWAYS a difference from computer screen to computer screen in colors. When you’re working with wedding plans, I recommend getting something physical that matches the color(s) you’ve picked. Whether it’s a fabric swatch, a piece of paper, or anything tangible in that color, hang on to it and share as needed.

But really though. Isn’t it addicting?

 

2016-12-14T21:26:03+00:00
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